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The Victoria Nikkei Cultural Society – Celebrating Japanese-Canadian Culture

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Luncheon shines a light on Japanese-Canadian Internment 75 years later

For Immediate Release
August 28, 2017

Luncheon shines a light on Japanese-Canadian Internment 75 years later  

The Victoria Nikkei Cultural Society is sharing the story of the tragedy of the Second World War relocation and internment of Japanese Canadians with the community at a special luncheon slated for Sunday, Sept. 10.

More than a dozen Internment survivors living in the Greater Victoria area will speak about their experiences on the 75th anniversary of the Internment to highlight this important history to the broader community.

Because it’s so hard to imagine this happening today, it’s critical that all Canadians — whether they have Japanese heritage or not — remember what happened with the Internments during the Second World War,” said VNCS President Tsugio Kurushima. “We are fortunate to still have first-hand witnesses who can share their stores with the generations who followed them.

Lasting from 1942 until 1949 (four years after the end of the war), Japanese-Canadians living in Coastal British Columbia were detained by the government, relocated to camps and farms in the Interior and in the rest of Canada, restricted in their movement and stripped of their businesses and homes. In fact, the sale of their personal property was used to fund the Internments.

People who never committed a crime were treated like criminals simply because of their heritage,” Kurushima added. “It’s a wrong the Canadian government apologized for in 1988 along with the launch of a redress program.

There will also be a presentation by Jordan Stanger-Ross, Project Director of the Landscapes of Injustice project housed at the University of Victoria. He will give a an update on the project exploring the forced dispossession of Japanese Canadians.

Where and When:

  • What: 75th Anniversary of Internment Luncheon
  • Where: Ambrosia Event Centre, 638 Fisgard St.
  • When: Sunday, Sept 10, 1 to 4:30 pm
  • Cost: $15 (Children 5-12 half price), includes buffet lunch with 2 hot entrees including a vegetarian lasagna option
  • Tickets: Contact Patti Ayukawa at Real English Victoria, #301 – 1111 Blanshard St (250-858-8445).
  • More info: InternmentAnniversary@vncs.ca

 

Media contact:
Tsugio Kurushima, President
Victoria Nikkei Cultural Society
(250) 384-2654

Remembering the Internment 75 years on

Remembering the Internment 75 years on

Detained having never committed a crime. Forced to leave home. Stripped of property and possessions. Threatened with deportation to a country they had never seen.

It’s hard to imagine from the distance of 75 years that anything like this could happen in Canada. But it did. It is exactly the experience so many Japanese Canadians survived through as the government forced them to abandon their lives on the B.C. coast and move to internment camps in the Interior and through the rest of Canada.

Because it’s so hard to imagine, it’s critical that all Canadians — whether they have Japanese heritage or not — remember what happened during the Internments during the Second World War. To help people remember the Victoria Nikkei Cultural Society is marking the 75th anniversary with a special luncheon Sept. 10.

A number of individuals from the Greater Victoria Nikkei community who lived through the Internment will share their experiences and memories at the luncheon. Their stories will offer a living document of what must never happen again.

There will also be a presentation by Jordan Stanger-Ross, Project Director of the Landscapes of Injustice project housed at the University of Victoria. Jordan will give a summary of their findings and describe the next phase of the project exploring the forced dispossession of Japanese Canadians.

There are a limited number of tickets available, so be sure to get yours today.

Where and When:

  • What: 75th Anniversary of Internment Luncheon
  • Where: Ambrosia Event Centre, 638 Fisgard St.
  • When: Sunday, Sept 10, 1 to 4:30 pm
  • Cost: $15 (Children 5-12 half price), includes buffet lunch with 2 hot entrees including a vegetarian lasagna option
  • Tickets: Contact Patti Ayukawa at Real English Victoria, #301 – 1111 Blanshard St (250-858-8445). Also available at Obon Matsuri event August 13 (noon to 4:30pm) Ross Bay Villa
  • More info: InternmentAnniversary@vncs.ca

The Right to Remain Film Screening

Public Screening:
A Right To Remain

Join filmmaker Greg Masuda for a screening of “A Right To Remain” followed by Q&A and discussion.

“The Right To Remain”, a CBC documentary, looks at the Downtown Eastside residents and the fight to save the community from development. Started as an idea five years ago, Greg Masuda accumulated over 300 hours of footage. He says “’The Right to Remain’ is a culmination of my entire career as a filmmaker. As a Japanese Canadian, I could not resist participating in the advocacy for the Downtown Eastside community as it looked down the barrel of the real estate industry in the second most expensive city in the world.”

Once known as “Japantown”, this area was home to thousands of Japanese Canadians before World War II.

Thursday, April 27, 2017
3:00-4:30 pm
Cinecenta
University of Victoria
Victoria BC

Free and open to the public

“The Legacy of Japanese Canadian Redress: A Reflection/An Assessment”

“The Legacy of Japanese Canadian Redress: A Reflection/An Assessment”

Wednesday, March 29, 2017
4:30 pm | David Strong Bld C116

With Roy Miki, GG award-winning poet and leader of redress movement.

Dr. Miki will offer an assessment of the legacy of redress including a comparative look at Japanese Canadian redress and the Indian Residential  Schools Settlement Agreement.
Free and open to the public

Japanese at Ross Bay – Tour at Ross Bay Cemetery

Sunday, June 5, 2016 Ross Bay Cemetery. Japanese at Ross Bay. This tour will be conducted by Gordon and Ann-Lee Switzer, authors of Sakura in Stone (2015) and Gateway to Promise (2012) on the histories of Japanese in Victoria. RBC includes graves of about 150 Japanese and is the location of the impressive Kakehashi Monument dedicated to Japanese pioneers.

SUNDAY TOUR START AT 2:00 PM   Charge:  $5 for non-members;  $2 for members.  Tours at Ross Bay Cemetery are signified RBC and start in front of Oregano’s, Fairfield Plaza, 1516 Fairfield Rd.
No reservations needed.

Contact www.oldcem.bc.ca or 250.598.8870.

2015 Hiroshima-Nagasaki Remembered (70th Anniversary)

hiroshima_memorial_dome

Hiroshima 1945

2015 Hiroshima-Nagasaki Remembered
70th Anniversary
What have we learned?

Thursday, August 6th 2015
7:00pm – 9:00pm
Esquimalt Gorge Park
1070 Tillicum Road, south of Gorge Rd.
Cost: FREE

The annual lantern ceremony, marking the 69th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Japan.

Lantern making starts at 7:30 pm, with words and songs of peace at 8 pm, followed by floating the lanterns in the Gorge.

Bring a blanket and/or chair to sit on, a flashlight and a battery candle if you wish.

Floating lantern supplies will be provided.

** Sponsored by the Victoria Raging Grannies and the Physicians for Global Survival**
Call 250 381 5120 for more information

2014 Hiroshima-Nagasaki Remembered (69th Anniversary)

Hiroshima Lanterns2014 Hiroshima-Nagasaki Remembered
69th Anniversary

Wednesday, August 6th 2014
7:00pm – 9:00pm
Esquimalt Gorge Park
(off Tillicum Road just south of the Gorge Waterway)
Cost: FREE

The annual lantern ceremony, marking the 69th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Japan.

Lantern making starts at 7:00 pm, with words and songs of peace at 8:00 pm, followed by floating the lanterns on the Gorge.

Bring a blanket and/or chair to sit on, a flashlight and a battery candle if you wish.

Floating lantern supplies will be provided.

** Sponsored by the Victoria Raging Grannies, Victoria Peace Coalition, Canadian Department of Peace Initiative

Dr. Michiko “Midge” Ayukawa – June 26, 1930 – October 24, 2013

midge-ayukawaThe family of Michiko Midge Ayukawa would like to inform you that she passed away peacefully with family by her side on October 24th in Victoria.

The funeral service will be held on Tuesday, October 29th at 5pm followed by a reception from 6 to 8pm at First Memorial on 1155 Fort Street, Victoria.In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Nikkei National Museum in Burnaby B.C. A private service and burial will be held in Ottawa at a later date.

Editor’s note: The entire Japanese Canadian community and Midge’s wider community mourns the loss of one our dearest and most treasured members. You have been a pillar and inspiration to us all. May peace be with you.

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/timescolonist/obituary.aspx?n=michiko-ayukawa-midge-ishii&pid=167704086&fhid=6809

Film screening of “A Sorry State” at UVic – Thursday, September 26th

SCREENING OF MITCH MIYAGAWA’S ‘A Sorry State’
HUMAN RIGHTS AND POLITICAL APOLOGY “What comes after the government says “sorry”?

A Sorry State Poster

Date: Thursday, September 26, 2013
Location: University of Victoria | Harry Hickman Building, Room 105
Time: 5:00pm – 7:30pm
Cost: Free and open to the public. Everyone welcome.

A documentary film screening of “A Sorry State” and facilitated panel discussion with film director Mitchell Miyagawa and political scientist Dr. Matt James that will provide space for participants to explore three landmark political apologies across diverse cultural and historical settings and the implications for human rights, social justice, conflict resolution and peace-making.

This event is co-sponsored by UVic’s Equity and Human Rights Office, the Social Justice Studies Program, and the Centre for Global Studies.